Nippon Kogaku, or Japan Optical Co, was formed on July 25, 1917, through the merger of three small optical firms, one of which was formed in 1881.

Historical information

Nikon Corporation was founded in 1917 by the merger of three optical equipment manufacturers (Seisakusho, Iwaki Glass Co, Fujii Lens) into a fully integrated company called Nippon Kogaku Kokyo KK. The company produced optical instruments for the Japanese Navy.

In 1932, the Nikkor lens trademark appeared. During World War II, the company grew to 19 factories and 23 thousand employees. The company produced binoculars, lenses, periscopes and scopes for the Japanese army. After the war, the company began producing civilian products in one plant under the control of the occupation administration. At the end of 1945 or the beginning of 1946, it was decided to launch an independent production of photographic equipment, research was carried out and the production of professional medium format and 35 mm cameras was originally planned. The idea of ​​a medium format camera was out of hand, and on April 15, 1946, a trial batch of Nikon I cameras was released. After improvements, the camera entered the market, but at first Nikon was bought reluctantly, unlike Minolta and Canon. The name "NIKON" was chosen probably on the basis that no one had ever met such a word anywhere else.

At the same time, supplies of lenses for 35 mm Canon cameras were discontinued. Nikon becomes the name of the company. In 1948, the export of Nikon I cameras to Hong Kong began.

In 1950, the Nikon S rangefinder camera was released. Since the beginning of the Korean War, American photojournalist David Douglas Duncan (eng. David Douglas Duncan) met a young Japanese photographer Jun Miki, who showed him the capabilities of a camera and lenses. Having appreciated the camera at its true worth, Duncan began to actively shoot and promote it among colleagues. This is how Nikon's cameras gained popularity in the US market, which has become a key one for the company. In 1953, Nippon Kogaku USA Inc. was founded. (now called Nikon Optical Co., Inc.) to export Nikon cameras to the United States.

In 1957, the production of the most successful rangefinder model "Nikon SP" began, not inferior in equipment and quality to the cult "Leica M3" with lensmi Carl Zeiss. In 1959, Nikon F appears and the company switches to the development of the most promising single-lens reflex cameras at that time, suspending work on rangefinder cameras. For nearly 30 years, the Nikon F family has been the gold standard in professional photography with technical excellence and reliability. In 1962, the company produced a 91 cm reflector telescope for the Tokyo Observatory. In 1974, a 105-cm Schmidt mirror-lens telescope was built for the Kiso observatory. In 1963 the Nikonos underwater camera with interchangeable lensmi. In 1971, the Nikon F2 was released, intended to replace the Nikon F and quickly gained popularity among professionals.

In 1980, the company began producing equipment for the production of semiconductors (photolithography). In the same year, the Nikon F3 appeared, the first professional camera with electronically controlled gateohm and digital LCD in the viewfinder. A special version of the Nikon F3 NASA took part in NASA space flights, replacing the outdated Nikon F NASA. In 1982, the S-100 color video camera for home video was released. Nikon Precision Inc. was founded in the USA. The company sells equipment for the semiconductor industry.

In 1983, the first serial professional autofocus camera of the Nikon F3 AF with two lensfor him: AF-Nikkor 80 / 2,8 and AF-Nikkor 200 / 3,5. In 1986, the production of zoom lenses for television cameras began. In 1988 the Nikon F4 camera with modern phase detection autofocus was launched. The camera became the world's first professional camera, the electric drive of which is not removable, and the trigger of a manual cocking shutter absent. Almost simultaneously, the release of the Nikon QV-1000C SLR video camera was launched, thanks to which the Associated Press was able to transmit to the newspapers a photograph of George W. Bush taking the oath, 45 seconds after the announcement of his election as president.

The first digital SLR camera developed by Nikon in conjunction with NASA based on the Nikon F4

In 1990, a branch of the company was opened in Thailand, and a year later a plant was built. By 2000, it employed 2000 people, and in 2004 already 8000. In 1991, together with NASA, Nikon developed one of the world's first digital SLR cameras based on the Nikon F4 and the latest CCD sensor with a resolution of 1 megapixel at that time. The camera was actively used in the Space Shuttle space program. In 1995, together with Fujifilm, a prototype of a digital camera was developed. In 1997 Nikon Coolpix 100 compact digital camera appeared. In 1999 the first professional digital SLR camera Nikon D1 was released. In 1996, the Nikon F5 was launched, and in 2004, the Nikon F6.

In 2006, the company significantly reduces the production of film cameras. Only the professional Nikon F6 and the simplest Nikon FM10, developed on the basis of the unified Cosina CT-1 chassis, continue to be produced. In 2007, the Nikon D3 camera was launched. In 2008, the Nikon D90 and Nikon D700 amateur cameras were introduced to the market - the company's second model equipped with a full-frame Nikon FX format sensor. In 2009, the company launched the D3s, which replaced the D3 and its first Nikon D5000 video-capable tilt-screen SLR. Since the D3, D90, D700, D300, D5000 models, Nikon cameras use photographymatrix CMOS, CCD was used until 2007matrix.

In 2010, Nikon D3100 and Nikon D7000 amateur cameras were introduced. In 2011, another amateur Nikon D5100 was released. In 2012, the professional Nikon D4 and the semi-professional Nikon D800, Nikon D800E and Nikon D600, as well as the amateur Nikon D3200 and Nikon D5200 are presented. Nikon Lao Co., Ltd. was founded in Laos in 2013. In 2014, the company's headquarters moved to Shinagawa (Tokyo District) at Shinagawa Intercity Tower C, 2-15-3, Konan, Minato-ku, Tokyo. In August 2010, the total production of Nikkor lenses reached 55 million units, in April 2011 - 60 million units [16], and in July 2016 exceeded 100 million units. Since 2016, the company has been producing the flagship model of the Nikon D5 professional camera. In 2017, Nikon celebrated its 100th anniversary, and a year later began mass production of the newest Nikon Z series full-frame mirrorless cameras.

activity

In June 2014, Nikon was restructured into four divisions:

  • Photographic equipment and photo accessories - production of cameras, photo lenses (under the Nikkor trademark), flashlights, sports optics (binoculars) and software.
  • Precision equipment - production of systems for the manufacture of microcircuits by immersion lithography, as well as systems for FPD lithography in the manufacture of LCD displays.
  • Instruments - manufacture of microscopes (including industrial ones) and measuring equipment.
  • Other directions - the production of medical equipment and ophthalmic lenses (joint company Nikon-Essilor Co., Ltd.).

Since 2006, the company has almost completely stopped the production of film cameras (only two models remained in the line - Nikon F6 and Nikon FM10), concentrating on the production of digital photographic equipment. At the same time, technical support for the discontinued cameras will continue for another ten years.

As of March 31, 2015, the company employed 25,4 thousand employees, of which 39,5% work in Japan, 49,4% in Asia and Oceania, 6,4% in Europe and 4,7% in USA.

As of 2010, Nikon ranks third in the world in camera stores after Canon and Sony with a 12,6% share (11,1% in 2009). In the digital SLR camera market, this brand is the second after Canon with a share of 29,8%.

In 2015, ¥ 586 billion in revenue fell to photographic equipment and optics, ¥ 170,8 billion to systems for the production of semiconductor components, ¥ 72,4 billion to microscopes and measuring instruments, and ¥ 28,6 billion to other industries; by sales region: Japan - ¥ 122,3 billion, USA - ¥ 200,6 billion, Europe - ¥ 212,4 billion, China - ¥ 120,7 billion, others - ¥ 201,9 billion.

Nikon in Russia

Nikon has a representative office in the CIS in Moscow. On July 1, 2008, Nikon LLC, a subsidiary of Nikon Corporation, began its activities in Moscow, which carries out and coordinates the sale and service of equipment manufactured by the Japanese company.

In December 2010, Nikon extended the NPS (Nikon Professional Services) service to Russia, which makes it possible to repair professional equipment in 48 hours or get a replacement during the repair, as well as make its annual free maintenance, cleaning and easy repairs.

Guide

Since June 2014, Makoto Kimura has been Chairman of the Management Board (with Nikon since 1974). At the same time, Kazuo Ushida (in the company since 1975) took the post of president, the post of chief financial officer and executive vice president - Junichi Ito (transferred from The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ).

Film Cameras

Nikon has become world famous for its cameras, mainly designed for 35mm film. The company remained the world leader in the camera industry for several decades, losing the leadership to Canon only in the late 1980s. In January 2006, Nikon announced that it would cease production of all film cameras and focus on the digital camera market. Only two models remained in the production line: the professional Nikon F6 and the most affordable amateur Nikon FM10. At the same time, the company guaranteed service for all produced film equipment for 10 years after the termination of production.

Small format SLR cameras without autofocus

Professional

  • Nikon F (1959-1972, sold under the name "Nikkor-F" in Germany)
  • Nikon F2 (1971-1980)
  • Nikon F3 (1980-1997)

Semi-professional

  • Nikkorex family (1960-1964)
  • Nikkormat F family (1965-1977, sold in Japan as "Nikomat F")
  • Nikon FM (1977)
  • Nikon FM2 (1982-2000)
  • Nikon FM10 (1995)
  • Nikon FM3A (2001)

Semi-professional electronically controlled

  • Nikkormat EL family (1972, marketed in Japan as "Nikomat EL")
  • Nikon EL2 (1977)
  • Nikon F.E. (1978)
  • Nikon F.E.2 (1983)
  • Nikon FA (1983)
  • Nikon F601m (1990) (called N6000 in North America)
  • Nikon F.E.10 (1996)

Entry level

  • Nikon EM (1979)
  • Nikon FG (1982)
  • Nikon FG20 (1984)
  • Nikon F301 (1985) (called N2000 in North America)

Enhanced Photo System Cameras

  • Nikon Pronea 600i (Pronea 6i, 1996)
  • Nikon Pronea S (1997)

Small format autofocus SLR cameras

Professional

  • Nikon F3AF (1983, modified F3)
  • Nikon F4 (1988)
  • Nikonos RS (1992)
  • Nikon F5 (1996)
  • Nikon F6 (2004)

Semi-professional

  • Nikon F501 (1986) (sold as N2020 in North America)
  • Nikon F801 (1988) (sold as N8008 in North America)
  • Nikon F801S (1991) (sold as N8008s in North America)
  • Nikon F90 (1992) (sold as N90 in North America)
  • Nikon F90X (1994) (sold as N90s in North America)
  • Nikon F80 (2000) (sold as N80 in North America)
  • Nikon F100 (1999)

Amateur

  • Nikon F601 (1990) (sold as N6006 in North America)
  • Nikon F70 (1994) (sold as N70 in North America)
  • Nikon F75 (2003) (sold as N75 in North America)

Entry level

  • Nikon F401 (1987) (sold as N4004 in North America)
  • Nikon F401S (1989) (sold as N4004s in North America)
  • Nikon F401X (1991) (sold as N5005 in North America)
  • Nikon F50 (1994) (sold as N50 in North America)
  • Nikon F60 (1999) (sold as N60 in North America)
  • Nikon F65 (2000) (sold as N65 in North America)
  • Nikon F55 (2002) (sold as N55 in North America)

Professional rangefinder cameras

Nikon SP camera

Compact Cameras

From 1983 to the early 2000s, Nikon produced a wide range of compact cameras. The first models were named according to the series in which they were included, for example, L35 / L135, RF / RD, W35 and so on. Later, the cameras began to receive a double name: in accordance with the series and the trade mark. Trade names corresponded to the class of the camera, for example, Zoom-touch with powerful zoom, Lite-touch for ultra-compact models, Fun-touch with simplified operation, and so on. In the late 1990s, Nikon abolished the series names, leaving only trade names. For example, all the compacts of the advanced photosystem were called Nuvis. The cost of compact Nikon cameras ranged from the cheapest simple "soap boxes" to the elite Nikon 28Ti and Nikon 35Ti models in a titanium body with spatial matrix metering.

Nikonos underwater cameras:

In 1963, Nikon launched the Nikonos series of diving cameras. The first models of the family were improved versions of the French Calypso camera, developed under the leadership of Jacques-Yves Cousteau. Nikon further improved the system, making it the most famous in the field of underwater photography.

  • Nikonos (1963)
  • Nikonos II (1968)
  • Nikonos III (1975)
  • Nikonos IV-A (1980)
  • Nikonos V (1984)
  • Nikonos RS AF (1992, world's first interchangeable-lens underwater camera with autofocus)

Movie cameras

In addition to photographic equipment, Nikon produced several models of amateur cinema cameras for 8-mm film.

Format 2 × 8

  • Nikkorex 8 (1960)
  • Nikkorex 8F (1963)

8-Super format

  • Nikon Super Zoom 8 (1966)
  • Nikon 8X Super Zoom (1967)
  • Nikon R8 Super Zoom (1973)
  • Nikon R10 Super Zoom (1973)

Camcorders

Throughout its history, Nikon has released the only camera model for recording home video. The model was called "Nikon Color Video Camera S-100" and was introduced in June 1982. The camera was intended for recording on an external video recorder, to which it was connected by a cable. The rapid development of combined devices combining a TV camera with a VCR in a common body did not allow the company to compete in the video market, and the direction was curtailed.

Video cameras

The company was one of the first to develop CCD-based filmless cameras. The first cameras stored an analog video signal on a magnetic disk, read from a matrix in one of the existing television standards. Therefore, the devices are called video cameras, and are not considered digital.

  • Nikon Still Video Camera Model 1 (Nikon SVC)

The prototype was designed and built for Nikon by Panasonic and was first shown at Photokina in 1986. The camera is made according to the scheme of a single-lens reflex camera, equipped with interchangeable lenswith bayonetThe new QV standard is compatible via the QM-100 adapter with Nikon F optics. The camera served as an exhibition model and was never sold.

  • Nikon QV-1000C

Mirror video camera with autofocus and interchangeable lensThe QV standard mi, unlike the previous model, was developed by Nikon independently, and was released on August 26, 1988. Like the previous model, the camera records black and white images on special Video Floppy disks developed by Sony. Designed for photojournalists working in a time-critical environment (QV stands for "Quick Vision" in the title). The color was sacrificed in favor of the clarity of the image, consisting of 380 thousand pixels. A QV-1010T transmitter was supplied with the camera, which allows transferring ready-made images via a telephone line.

With the advent of the first digital cameras, the clarity of which is not limited by television standards of decomposition, and the analog signal free from the accumulation of distortions, videocameras quickly fell into disuse. Nikon's developments in this direction were curtailed, and the efforts of the designers concentrated on digital equipment.

Digital cameras

Compact digital cameras

The history of the Nikon Coolpix family began in 1997 with the Coolpix 100 model with a 330-kilopixel CCD-matrix [13]. The line continues to be produced for the third decade and includes compact cameras of a wide variety of types: from advanced to pseudo-mirror and simple "soap boxes". A total of five lines were released, each of which corresponds to one or two letters at the beginning of the index denoting the model: A, AW, L, P and S. The most advanced models begin with the letter “P”, which stands for Performance.

Large sensor cameras

  • Nikon Coolpix P6000, August 2008 (CCD, 14 Megapixels, 4x zoom)
  • Nikon Coolpix P7000, September 2010 (10,1 Megapixel CCD, 7x zoom)
  • Nikon Coolpix P7100, August 2011 (same as previous model)
  • Nikon Coolpix P7700
  • Nikon Coolpix A, March 2013 (16 megapixels, matrix Nikon DX)
  • Nikon Coolpix A900
  • Nikon Coolpix P7800

Fast lens compacts

  • Nikon Coolpix P300
  • Nikon Coolpix P310
  • Nikon Coolpix P330
  • Nikon Coolpix P340

Pseudo-mirror cameras

  • Nikon Coolpix L810, February 2012, 16 megapixels, 26x zoom, ISO 80-1600
  • Nikon Coolpix L820, January 2013, 16 megapixels, 30x zoom, ISO 125-3200
  • Nikon Coolpix L830, January 2014, 16 megapixels, 34x zoom, ISO 125-1600
  • Nikon Coolpix L840 February 2015, 16 megapixels, 38x zoom, ISO 125-1600
  • Nikon Coolpix P500, February 2011, 12,1 megapixels, 36x zoom, ISO 160-3200
  • Nikon Coolpix P510, February 2012, 16,1 Megapixels, 41,7x zoom (24-1000mm), ISO 100-3200
  • Nikon Coolpix P520, January 2013, 18,1 megapixels, 42x zoom, ISO 80-3200
  • Nikon Coolpix P530, February 2014, 16,1 megapixels, 42x zoom, ISO 100-1600 (ISO extendable up to 6400)
  • Nikon Coolpix P600, February 2014, 16,1 megapixels, 60x zoom, ISO 100-1600 (ISO extendable up to 6400)
  • Nikon Coolpix P610
  • Nikon Coolpix B500, February 2016, 16 megapixels, 40x zoom, ISO 160-6400
  • Nikon Coolpix P900
  • Nikon Coolpix P1000

In 2016, a line of premium compact cameras Nikon DL with a 1-inch diagonal sensor was announced. The cameras were supposed to use lenses developed for consumer-grade SLR cameras: 1-24 / 85-1,8; 2,8-18 / 50-1,8; 2,8-24 / 500-2,8. However, already in February of next year, the cancellation of the issue was announced due to doubts about commercial success.

DSLR digital cameras

Professional

  • Nikon D1 Nikon DX sensor, introduced June 15, 1999, discontinued;
  • Nikon D1X Nikon DX sensor, introduced February 5, 2001, discontinued;
  • Nikon D1H sensor Nikon DX increased frame rate, introduced February 5, 2001, discontinued;
  • Nikon D2H sensor Nikon DX, introduced July 22, 2003, discontinued;
  • Nikon D2X Nikon DX sensor, introduced September 16, 2004, discontinued;
  • Nikon D2HS Nikon DX sensor with increased frame rate, introduced February 16, 2005, discontinued;
  • Nikon D2XS Nikon DX sensor, introduced June 1, 2006, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3 full frame, introduced August 23, 2007, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3X full frame, introduced December 1, 2008, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3S full frame, introduced October 14, 2009, discontinued;
  • Nikon D4 full frame, introduced January 6, 2012, discontinued;
  • Nikon D4S full frame, introduced February 25, 2014, discontinued;
  • Nikon D5 full frame Introduced January 5, 2016
  • Nikon D6 full frame, introduced February 12, 2020

Semi-professional

  • Nikon D100 Nikon DX sensor, introduced February 21, 2002, discontinued;
  • Nikon D200 Nikon DX sensor, introduced November 1, 2005, discontinued;
  • Nikon D300 Nikon DX sensor, introduced August 23, 2007, discontinued;
  • Nikon D300S Nikon DX sensor, introduced July 30, 2009, discontinued;
  • Nikon D700 full frame, introduced July 1, 2008, discontinued;
  • Nikon D800 full-frame, introduced February 7, 2012, discontinued;
  • Nikon D800E full frame, introduced April 2012, discontinued;
  • Nikon D600 full-frame, introduced September 13, 2012, discontinued;
  • Nikon D610 full frame, introduced in October 2013;
  • Nikon Df full frame, introduced November 2013;
  • Nikon D810 full frame, introduced in June 2014;
  • Nikon D750 full-frame, introduced September 11, 2014;
  • Nikon D810A full frame, introduced in February 2015;
  • Nikon D500 Nikon DX Sensor Introduced January 5, 2016;
  • Nikon D850 Full Frame Introduced July 25, 2017
  • Nikon D780 full frame Introduced January 7, 2020

Semi-Pro with Nikon DX Sensor

  • Nikon D70, introduced January 28, 2004, discontinued;
  • Nikon D70S, introduced April 20, 2005, discontinued;
  • Nikon D80, introduced August 9, 2006, discontinued;
  • Nikon D90, introduced August 27, 2008, discontinued;
  • Nikon D7000, introduced September 15, 2010, discontinued;
  • Nikon D7100, introduced February 21, 2013, discontinued;
  • Nikon D7200, introduced March 2, 2015;
  • Nikon D7500, introduced April 12, 2017;

For advanced amateurs

  • Nikon D5000, introduced April 14, 2009, discontinued;
  • Nikon D5100, introduced April 5, 2011, discontinued;
  • Nikon D5200, introduced November 6, 2012, discontinued;
  • Nikon D5300, introduced October 17, 2013;
  • Nikon D5500, introduced January 5, 2015, discontinued;
  • Nikon D5600 Introduced November 10, 2016

Entry level

  • Nikon D50, introduced April 20, 2005, discontinued;
  • Nikon D40, introduced November 16, 2006, discontinued;
  • Nikon D40X, introduced March 6, 2007, discontinued;
  • Nikon D60, introduced January 29, 2008, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3000, introduced July 30, 2009, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3100, introduced August 19, 2010, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3200, introduced April 19, 2012, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3300, introduced January 7, 2014, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3400, introduced August 17, 2016, discontinued;
  • Nikon D3500 Introduced August 3, 2018

Nikon on the portal

Nikon Lenses

Fixes

  1. Nikon 10 mm f / 2.8 RF Aspherical 1 Nikkor CX
  2. Nikon 10.5 mm f / 2.8G ED Nikkor DX AF Fisheye
  3. Nikon 20 mm f / 1.8G ED N AF-S Nikkor
  4. Nikon 20 mm f / 2.8 Nikkor AI-S
  5. Nikon 20 mm f / 2.8D AF Nikkor
  6. Nikon 24 mm f / 2.8 Nikkor AI
  7. Nikon 24 mm f / 2.8 AF Nikkor MKII
  8. Nikon 24 mm f / 1.4GN AF-S Nikkor ED
  9. Nikon 28 mm f / 3.5 Nikkor-H Auto PRE-AI
  10. Nikon 28 mm f / 3.5 Nikkor (K, New Nikon)
  11. Nikon 28 mm f / 2.8 Lens Series E
  12. Nikon 28 mm f / 2.8 MKII Lens Series e. Review from the reader Radozhiva
  13. Nikon 28 mm f / 2.8 AF Nikkor MKI
  14. Nikon 28 mm f / 2.8 AF Nikkor (MKII)
  15. Nikon 28 mm f / 2.8D AF Nikkor
  16. Nikon 28 mm f / 2 Nikkor AI MF
  17. Nikon 28 mm f / 1.8GN AF-S Nikkor
  18. Nikon 35 mm f / 2 Nikkor AI-S
  19. Nikon 35 mm f / 2 AF Nikkor MKI
  20. Nikon 35 mm f / 2D AF Nikkor MKII
  21. Nikon 35 mm f / 1.8G AF-S DX Nikkor
  22. Nikon 40 mm f / 2.8G DX AF-S Micro Nikkor
  23. Nikon 50 mm f / 2 Nippon Kogaku Japan Nikkor-S Auto NON-AI MF
  24. Nikon 50 mm f / 2 Nikkor-HC Auto Non-AI MF
  25. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 Lens Series E MKII
  26. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 Nikkor (AI-S). Review from the reader Radozhiva
  27. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 AF Nikkor MK I
  28. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 AF Nikkor MKII, MIJ
  29. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 AF Nikkor MKII, NJ
  30. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 AF Nikkor MKII, MIC
  31. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8D AF Nikkor MK III
  32. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8G AF-S Nikkor
  33. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.8 SZ Nikkor
  34. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.4 Nikkor-S Auto Non-AI MF
  35. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.4 Nikkor-SC Auto Non-AI MF
  36. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.4D AF Nikkor made in Japan
  37. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.4D AF Nikkor made in China
  38. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.4G AF-S Nikkor
  39. Nikon 50 mm f / 1.2 Nikkor (AI-S MF)
  40. Nippon Kogaku Japan Nikkor-S Auto 1: 1.2 f = 55mm
  41. Nikon 55 mm f / 1.2 Nikkor-SC Auto (NON-AI)
  42. Nikon 55 mm f / 1.2 Nikkor (Non-AI MF K)
  43. Nikon 55 mm f / 3.5 Nippon Kogaku Japan Auto Micro-Nikkor (Non-AI MF)
  44. Nikon 55 mm f / 3.5 Micro-NIKKOR-P Auto (NON-AI MF)
  45. Nikon 55 mm f / 2.8 Micro-Nikkor (AI-S MF)
  46. Nikon 58 mm f / 1.4GN AF-S Nikkor
  47. Nikon 60 mm f / 2.8 AF Micro Nikkor (MKI)
  48. Nikon 60 mm f / 2.8D AF Micro Nikkor (MKII)
  49. Nikon 60 mm f / 2.8GN AF-S Micro Nikkor ED IF Aspherical (MKII)
  50. Nikon 85 mm f / 3.5G ED VR IF DX AF-S Micro Nikkor
  51. Nikon 85 mm f / 2 Nikkor (AI-S). Review from the reader Radozhiva
  52. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.8 Nippon Kogaku Japan Nikkor-H Auto (Non-AI MF)
  53. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.8 Nikkor (Non-AI MF K)
  54. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.8 AF Nikkor (MKI)
  55. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.8D AF Nikkor
  56. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.8G AF-S IF Nikkor
  57. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.4 Nikkor AI-S
  58. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.4D AF Nikkor
  59. Nikon 85 mm f / 1.4GN AF-S Nikkor
  60. Nikon 100 mm f / 2.8 Series E MF
  61. Nikon 105 mm f / 2.8 AF Micro Nikkor (MKI)
  62. Nikon 105 mm f / 2.8D AF Micro Nikkor
  63. Nikon 105 mm f / 2.8G ED VR IF N AF-S Micro Nikkor
  64. Nikon 105 mm f / 2.5 Nikkor AI MF
  65. Nikon 105 mm  f / 2.5 nippon Kogaku Japan Nikkor-P Auto. Radozhiva Reader Review
  66. Nikon 105 mm f / 2D AF DC-Nikkor Defocus Image Control
  67. Nikon 105 mm f / 1.8 Nikkor AI-S MF
  68. Nikon 135 mm f / 2.8 Nikkor-Q Auto Non-Ai MF
  69. Nikon 135 mm f / 2.8 Nikkor K, AI MF
  70. Nikon 135 mm f / 2 Nikkor AI MF
  71. Nikon 135 mm f / 2D AF DC-Nikkor Defocus Image Control. Review from the reader Radozhiva
  72. Nikon 180 mm f / 2.8 ED Nikkor AI-S MF
  73. Nikon 180 mm f / 2.8 ED AF Nikkor MKIII
  74. Nikon 180 mm f / 2.8D ED AF Nikkor MKIV
  75. Nikon 200 mm f / 4 NIKKOR-Q Non-AI MF
  76. Nikon 200 mm 1:4 Micro-nikkor (AI). Review from the reader Radozhiva
  77. Nikon 300 mm f / 4.5 Nikkor-H Nippon Kogaku Japan Auto Non-AI MF
  78. Nikon 300 mm f / 2.8 ED AF Nikkor
  79. Nikon 300 mm f / 4D IF ED AF-S
  80. Nikon 300 mm f / 4 ED AF Nikkor
  81. Nikon 300 mm f / 4.5 Nikkor * ED (AI-S)
  82. Nikon 500mmm f / 4 P ED NIKKOR

Zuma

  1. Nikon 10-24 mm 1: 3.5-4.5G DX AF-S Nikkor ED IF
  2. Nikon 10-30 mm f / 3.5-5.6 VR IF Aspherical 1 Nikkor CX
  3. Nikon 11-27.5 mm f / 3.5-5.6 ED Aspherical 1 Nikkor AW CX
  4. Nikon 12-24 mm f / 4G ED DX AF-S SWM IF Nikkor
  5. Nikon 16-85 mm f / 3.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR DX Nikkor
  6. Nikon 17-35 mm f / 2.8D ED AF-S SWM IF Nikkor
  7. Nikon 17-55 mm f / 2.8G ED IF AF-S DX Nikkor
  8. Nikon 18-35 mm f / 3.5-4.5D IF ED AF Nikkor
  9. Nikon 18-55 mm f / 3.5-5.6G VR AF-S DX Nikkor
  10. Nikon 18-55 mm f / 3.5-5.6GII VRII AF-S DX Nikkor
  11. Nikon 18-55 mm f / 3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX Nikkor
  12. Nikon 18-55 mm f / 3.5-5.6GII ED AF-S DX Nikkor
  13. Nikon 18-55 mm f / 3.5-5.6G DX VR AF-P Nikkor 
  14. Nikon 18-70 mm f / 3.5-4.5G ED AF-S DX IF Nikkor
  15. Nikon 18-105 mm f / 3.5-5.6G ED VR AF-S DX Nikkor
  16. Nikon 18-135 mm f / 3.5-5.6G IF-ED AF-S DX Nikkor
  17. Nikon 18-140 mm f / 3.5-5.6G ED VR AF-S DX Nikkor
  18. Nikon 18-200 mm f / 3.5-5.6G DX AF-S Nikkor IF ED VR
  19. Nikon 18-200 mm f / 3.5-5.6GII DX AF-S Nikkor IF ED VR
  20. Nikon 18-300 mm f / 1: 3.5-6.3G DX VR AF-S ED SWM IF Aspherical
  21. Nikon 20-35 mm f / 2.8D AF Nikkor
  22. Nikon 24-50 mm f / 3.3-4.5 AF Nikkor. Review from the reader Radozhiva
  23. Nikon 24-70 mm f / 2.8G ED AF-S N Nikkor
  24. Nikon 24-85 mm f / 3.5-4.5G ED VR IF AF-S Nikkor
  25. Nikon 24-85 mm f / 2.8-4D AF IF Nikkor
  26. Nikon 24-120 mm f / 3.5-5.6D AF Nikkor
  27. Nikon 24-120 mm f / 3.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR Nikkor
  28. Nikon 24-120 mm f / 4G N AF-S Nikkor ED VR IF Aspherical
  29. Nikon 28-70 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor (MKI)
  30. Nikon 28-70 mm f / 3.5-4.5D AF Nikkor (MKII)
  31. Nikon 28-70 mm f / 2.8D ED AF-S Nikkor
  32. Nikon 28-80 mm f / 3.5-5.6D AF Nikkor MKII
  33. Nikon 28-80 mm f / 3.3-5.6G AF Nikkor MKIII
  34. Nikon 28-85 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor MKI
  35. Nikon 28-85 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor MKII
  36. Nikon 28-100 mm f / 3.5-5.6G AF Nikkor
  37. Nikon 28-105 mm f / 3.5-4.5D AF Nikkor
  38. Nikon 28-200 mm f / 3.5-5.6D AF Nikkor
  39. Nikon 28-200 mm f / 3.5-5.6G ED AF Nikkor IF
  40. Nikon 28-300 mm f / 3.5-5.6G SWM VR IF ED AF-S Nikkor Aspherical
  41. Nikon 35-70 mm f / 3.3-4.5 Zoom-Nikkor AI-S MF
  42. Nikon 35-70 mm f / 3.3-4.5 AF Nikkor MKI
  43. Nikon 35-70 mm f / 3.3-4.5 AF Nikkor MKII
  44. Nikon 35-70 mm f / 2.8 AF Nikkor
  45. Nikon 35-70 mm f / 2.8D AF Nikkor
  46. Nikon 35-80 mm f / 4-5.6D AF Nikkor MKI
  47. Nikon 35-80 mm f / 4-5.6D AF Nikkor MKII
  48. Nikon 35-105 mm f / 3.5-4.5 Zoom-NIKKOR AI-S
  49. Nikon 35-105 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor MKI
  50. Nikon 35-105 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor MKII
  51. Nikon 35-105 mm f / 3.5-4.5D AF Nikkor MKIII
  52. Nikon 35-135 mm f / 3.5-4.5 Zoom-Nikkor AI-S
  53. Nikon 35-135 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor MKI
  54. Nikon 35-135 mm f / 3.5-4.5 AF Nikkor MKII
  55. Nikon 43-86 mm f / 3.5 Nippon Kogaku Japan Zoom-Nikkor Auto non-AI MF
  56. Nikon 55-200 mm f / 4-5.6G AF-S DX ED Nikkor
  57. Nikon 55-200 mm f / 4-5.6G IF ED AF-S DX VR Nikkor
  58. Nikon 55-200 mm f / 4-5.6GII ED VR II DX AF-S Nikkor
  59. Nikon 55-300 mm f / 4.5-5.6G DX AF-S ED VR HRI Nikkor
  60. Nikon 60-180 mm f / 4-5.6 IX-NIKKOR 
  61. Nikon 70-200 mm f / 4G ED VR IF N AF-S Nikkor
  62. Nikon 70-200 mm f / 2.8G ED AF-S VR-Nikkor
  63. Nikon 70-200 mm f / 2.8GII VR IF ED N AF-S Nikkor
  64. Nikon 70-210 mm f / 4-5.6 AF Nikkor MKI
  65. Nikon 70-210 mm f / 4-5.6D AF Nikkor MKII
  66. Nikon 70-210 mm f / 4 Lens Series E Zoom 
  67. Nikon 70-210 mm f / 4 AF Nikkor
  68. Nikon 70-300 mm f / 4-5.6D ED AF Nikkor
  69. Nikon 70-300 mm f / 4-5.6G AF Nikkor
  70. Nikon 70-300 mm f / 4.5-5.6G IF-ED AF-S VR Nikkor
  71. Nikon 70-300 mm f / 4.5-6.3G ED VR AF-P DX. Review from the reader Radozhiva
  72. Nikon 75-150 mm 1: 3.5 Lens Series E Zoom MKII
  73. Nikon 75-240 mm f / 4.5-5.6 AF Nikkor. Review from the reader Radozhiva
  74. Nikon 75-300 mm f / 4.5-5.6 AF Nikkor
  75. Nikon 80-200 mm f / 4.5 Zoom-NIKKOR AI, MKII
  76. NIKON 80-200 mm f / 4 Zoom-NIKKOR (AI-S)
  77. Nikon 80-200 mm f / 4.5-5.6D AF Nikkor
  78. Nikon 80-200 mm f / 2.8 ED AF Nikkor MKI
  79. Nikon 80-200 mm f / 2.8D ED AF Nikkor MKII
  80. Nikon 80-200 mm f / 2.8D ED AF Nikkor MKIII
  81. Nikon 80-200 mm f / 2.8D ED AF-S Nikkor MKIV
  82. Nikon 80-400 mm f / 4.5-5.6D ED AF VR-Nikkor
  83. Nikon 80-400 mm f / 4.5-5.6G ED VR IF N AF-S Nikkor

 


Adapters for cameras and lenses

Sometimes I buy photographic equipment from the USSR and not only. You can offer your write me. Help the project: 5469 1200 1062 4624. Comments can be left without registration and SMS

Add a comment

Your email address will not be published.